Blueprints for Caring Archives - Teaching Empathy Institute
Teaching Empathy Institute works to establish emotionally and physically safe learning communities for elementary, middle and high school students and the adults who work with them. Working in the Hudson Valley of New York, TEI creates tailor-made programs designed to foster dialogue about social culture building while strengthening the capacity for the infusion of empathy and compassion into all aspects of the learning experience.
Teaching Empathy Institute, SEL, Social and emotional learning, mindfulness, diversity, education, bullying, anti-bullying, k-12, learning, david levine, school of belonging
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I like to begin this lesson with an explanation such as this: Have you ever left home and suddenly realized you've forgotten something such as your homework or lunch? Once you thought "Oh, I forgot that," you were able to get whatever it was you forgot before you were too far from home. But who said, "Oh, I forgot that?" This was your inner voice. The inner voice talks to you with unexpected thoughts or physical feelings and sensations (saying for example, "this just doesn't feel right"). Pass out index cards and have students write down one situation in which...

Miracle Questions Reframing gives students a more optimistic and hopeful picture of their world after moderate problems like having a disagreement, doing poorly on a test, or feeling embarrassed in front of their peers. Ask students to imagine that they are having a bad day or dealing with a difficult situation such as feeling embarrassed or having an argument or disagreement with a friend. Then suggest that the next time this happens, they can “reframe” their experience by answering the following questions; What is going well right now? How would you like to feel when you come to school? Who could you...

Creating an on-going feeling word vocabulary can also be seen as improving one’s emotional literacy. Emotional literacy is reflective of someone with a high degree of emotional intelligence. A person with high EQ is able to manage his or her emotions during stressful times. #CASEL Feeling Words Vocabulary Builder Distribute a handout of “Feeling Words”, (see below). Ask students to help you define each word, and brainstorm with them on other words to add. Then ask each student to: Star six words that they use often Underline six words that they seldom use Circle any words that they do not understand Ask students...

The collection of social skills acquired throughout a person’s life can be referred to as the “survival file” The survival file consists of practical life skills that a person will need throughout life, such as how to work with and get along with others, how to express feelings in a healthy way, how to respond to rejection, and how to choose and make friends. Any cooperative activity, group dialogue or lesson in the vocabulary of feeling will help to fill the survival file. Create survival files with your students: Have students write survival file instructions on a colored index card and laminate the...

When a person has success while working with another, that experience takes on an aura of meaning and purpose. When a teacher intentionally provides opportunities for students to take part I meaningful collaborative activities, such as creating a welcoming celebration for a new student or co-teaching a lesson, trust-building is a natural part of the process. The students also are practicing the crucial life skills of planning, negotiation, compromise, listening, and responsibility. Identify for yourself two-person jobs within the classroom. Whenever there is a task to be carried out, make it a two-person job and find two students to work...